Jens Oliver Meiert

Website Optimization Measures, Part I

Post from February 10, 2008 (↻ August 8, 2017), filed under .

This and many other posts are also available as a pretty, well-behaved e-book: On Web Development. And speaking of which, here’s a short treatise just about managing the quality of websites: The Little Book of Website Quality Control.

Permanent focus on QA requires an occasional website review, not necessarily always a “redesign” or “relaunch.” This week I spent some time analyzing, refactoring, and optimizing my personal sites. I thought to share a few things for inspiration and discussion:

As I’ll be leaving Bremen tomorrow for a few days of home search in Zurich and my next farewell tour in Berlin, I had to hurry a little bit and keep some arguments and explanations a little short. At least four additional measures are waiting in part II, however. 😊

This has been the first part of an open article series. There are seven additional articles on website optimization, part II, part III, part IV, part V, part VI, part VII, and part VIII.

About the Author

Jens Oliver Meiert, photo of July 27, 2015.

Jens Oliver Meiert is an author, developer (O’Reilly, W3C, ex-Google), and philosopher. He experiments with art and adventure. Here on meiert.com he shares and generalizes and exaggerates some of his thoughts and experiences.

There’s more Jens in the archives and at Goodreads. If you have any questions or concerns (or recommendations) about what he writes, leave a comment or a message.

Comments (Closed)

  1. On February 12, 2008, 16:47 CET, Stefan Nitzsche said:

    From my point of view, it makes sense to think about a blog post before you publish it, and not with hindsight. I think that users don’t like to comment on posts that will be possibly edited or deleted during a “blog review“. And much more important: I would never touch a comment, because the writer meant it the way he wrote it. My changes would only affect the typographical, grammatical and orthographical correctness.

    Live with your past babble and look forward to make it better. 😊

  2. On February 14, 2008, 22:41 CET, Jens Oliver Meiert said:

    Thank you, Stefan, I guess you point out a few things other readers might wonder about as well:

    From my point of view, it makes sense to think about a blog post before you publish it, and not with hindsight.

    Of course. Alas, mistakes occur, and to quote Confucius: “A man who has committed a mistake and doesn’t correct it, is committing another mistake.”

    I think that users don’t like to comment on posts that will be possibly edited or deleted during a “blog review“.

    Maybe I didn’t make myself clear about that: Unless comments are “spammy” (or violate the comment guidelines), no comment gets edited or removed. I absolutely understand concerns about this measure, but it is supposed to benefit all people involved. (It won’t happen often, either.)

    And much more important: I would never touch a comment, because the writer meant it the way he wrote it.

    Neither spam nor offensive comments? (The latter didn’t appear in my blog yet, but I wouldn’t tolerate them.)

  3. On November 3, 2008, 21:11 CET, Santhos said:

    I just came in on part V and decided to start with part 1. Great serie of articles with finally not such a common approach to web optimization. You’re digging a little deeper then what I come across most of the time.

    Folder structure is a good one. I do not always use the same map structure and that sucks… Especially when I sometimes copy and paste some stuff and find out half an hour later that some path is incorrect… 😉

Read More

Have a look at the most popular posts, possibly including:

Or maybe say hi on Twitter, Google+, or LinkedIn?

Looking for a way to comment? Comments have been disabled, unfortunately.

Flattr? Found a mistake? Email me, jens@meiert.com.

You are here: HomeArchive2008 → Website Optimization Measures, Part I

Last update: August 8, 2017

“The end does not justify the means.”