Jens Oliver Meiert

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Website Optimization Measures, Part I

Post from February 10, 2008 (↻ August 3, 2022), filed under .

This and many other posts are also available as a pretty, well-behaved ebook: On Web Development. And speaking of which, here’s a short treatise just about managing the quality of websites: The Little Book of Website Quality Control (updated).

Focus on QA requires occasional website reviews, not necessarily immediate redesigns or relaunches. This week I spent some time analyzing, refactoring, and optimizing my personal sites. I thought to share a few things for inspiration and discussion:

As I’ll be leaving Bremen tomorrow for a few days of home search in Zurich and my next farewell tour in Berlin, I had to hurry and keep some arguments and explanations a little short. At least four additional measures are waiting in part II, however. 😊

This is a part of an open article series. Check out some of the other posts!

About Me

Jens Oliver Meiert, on September 30, 2021.

I’m Jens, and I’m an engineering lead—currently manager for Developer Experience at LivePerson—and author. I’ve worked as a technical lead for Google, I’m close to W3C and WHATWG, and I write and review books for O’Reilly. I love trying things, sometimes including philosophy, art, and adventure. Here on meiert.com I share some of my views and experiences.

If you have a question or suggestion about what I write, please leave a comment (if available) or a message. Thank you!

Comments (Closed)

  1. On February 12, 2008, 16:47 CET, Stefan Nitzsche said:

    From my point of view, it makes sense to think about a blog post before you publish it, and not with hindsight. I think that users don’t like to comment on posts that will be possibly edited or deleted during a “blog review“. And much more important: I would never touch a comment, because the writer meant it the way he wrote it. My changes would only affect the typographical, grammatical and orthographical correctness.

    Live with your past babble and look forward to make it better. 😊

  2. On February 14, 2008, 22:41 CET, Jens Oliver Meiert said:

    Thank you, Stefan; you point out a few things other readers might wonder about as well:

    From my point of view, it makes sense to think about a blog post before you publish it, and not with hindsight.

    Of course. Alas, mistakes occur, and to quote Confucius: “A man who has committed a mistake and doesn’t correct it, is committing another mistake.”

    I think that users don’t like to comment on posts that will be possibly edited or deleted during a “blog review“.

    Maybe I didn’t make myself clear about that: Unless comments are “spammy” (or violate the comment guidelines), no comment gets edited or removed. I absolutely understand concerns about this measure, but it’s supposed to benefit everyone involved.

    And much more important: I would never touch a comment, because the writer meant it the way he wrote it.

    Neither spam nor offensive comments? (The latter didn’t appear in my blog yet, but I wouldn’t tolerate them.)

  3. On November 3, 2008, 21:11 CET, Santhos said:

    I just came in on part V and decided to start with part 1. Great serie of articles with finally not such a common approach to web optimization. You’re digging a little deeper then what I come across most of the time.

    Folder structure is a good one. I do not always use the same map structure and that sucks… Especially when I sometimes copy and paste some stuff and find out half an hour later that some path is incorrect… 😉

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