Jens Oliver Meiert


Jens Oliver Meiert on philosophy, adventure, arts, and quality web development. Sometimes based on temper and to provoke, usually on thinking and to share.

On the Anatomy of Beliefs

From a philosophical viewpoint, here a strictly solipsistic one, any statement is a belief. Beliefs are important because they determine how we interpret, and per some schools of thought, make our realities…

Post from November 8, 2015, reflecting Jens the .

Personally Speaking

After my eternal travels I’ve had entered a new stage of my life. Now that I and the dust have settled a little, the position that I assume in the world is a bit more clear, at least for the next couple of years. A few notes…

Post from October 30, 2015, reflecting Jens the .

The 1,000 Lives Thought Experiment

Open up your editor or grab a piece of paper, and write down what you’d do if you had another life. Or what you’d wish for in another life. Assume that anything goes…

Post from October 27, 2015, reflecting Jens the .

Rules for the Media: Independence, Transparency, Accountability, Comparative Reporting

I’ve suggested to opt out of following news for the simple reason that “news” rarely constitute reliable and actionable information, and in the spirit that even ignorance may be preferable so to at least keep an open mind. Now, what would make me change this view?

Post from October 10, 2015, reflecting Jens the .

Media: The Choice Between Misinformation and Uninformation

“The man who reads nothing at all is better educated than the man who reads nothing but newspapers.”—Our media, generally speaking, are not trustworthy. They are not trustworthy because of conflicts of interest…

Post from October 6, 2015, reflecting Jens the .

What I’ve Hated and What I’ve Loved About Web Development

In “On Web Development” and in other contexts I’ve alluded to wrapping up, ending my old career. That’s only correct to an extent. (In keeping with the intelligence community, always put everyone at risk by adding backdoors.)

Post from September 30, 2015, reflecting Jens the .

The Problem of “Fire and Forget” in Web Design

If I were to pick the main issue in web design… I couldn’t answer immediately. I don’t think there are so many, but there are a few, they are very different, they operate on different scales, and so they’re hard to compare. One, however, is “fire and forget.”

Post from September 17, 2015, reflecting Jens the .

On Science Experimenting on Life

There are boundaries, and some boundaries are non-negotiable.

Post from September 10, 2015, reflecting Jens the .

The Teaching Dilemma

When we’re here to learn, is it at all said that we can be taught?

Post from September 7, 2015, reflecting Jens the .

Fear and the Creative Dilemma

In the Seth school of thought there’s a very interesting issue, the creative dilemma. In short, there’s identity which constantly attempts to maintain stability, there’s action which inherently drives towards change, and that combination…

Post from September 3, 2015, reflecting Jens the .

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Jens Oliver Meiert, photo of April 13, 2013.

Jens Oliver Meiert is a German author, philosopher, adventurer, artist, and developer.

As a philosopher in spe Jens protests for the respect for life but still sharpens his profile through the focused study of philosophy, psychology, social sciences, politics, &c.

As an adventurer Jens explores all conceivable activities (100 Things I Learned as an Everyday Adventurer) and localities (Journey of J.).

As an artist in spe Jens experiments with conventional and animated photography, technical curiosities, and performance art.

As a developer Jens is specialized in complex international websites (Google), works on standards (W3C), and writes for technical publishers (O’Reilly, Webdesign mit CSS, The Little Book of HTML/CSS Frameworks; On Web Development).

Jens Oliver Meiert on Google+.

Jens does also smile, Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, and XING.

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Last update: November 8, 2015.

“To change the world for the better, you must begin by changing your own life.”