Jens Oliver Meiert

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Accessibility Heuristics

Post from October 7, 2008 (↻ July 6, 2021), filed under .

You can keep your accessibility knowledge sharp by internalizing heuristics and ground rules. Just having updated my German article on accessibility heuristics it looked useful to share these in English as well. The guidelines and rules are based on documentation provided by the W3C and IBM and come without comment; it’s still useful, indispensable even, to consult the source material.

W3C

WCAG 1.0 Quick Tips

The classic “quick tips” derived from the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0:

(It’s great that QA is called out!)

WCAG 2.0 Quick Tips

With WCAG 2.0 come new and improved tips:

WCAG 3.0 Guidelines [Update (July 6, 2021)]

WCAG 3.0 is in progress and may offer tips similar to prior WCAG versions. Its general structure offers rough orientation:

IBM

IBM once shared their own set of accessibility recommendations and heuristics that is now, along with more detailed information, offered by the ACM:

About Me

Jens Oliver Meiert, on September 30, 2021.

I’m Jens, and I’m an engineering lead—currently manager for Developer Experience at LivePerson—and author. I’ve worked as a technical lead for Google, I’m close to W3C and WHATWG, and I write and review books for O’Reilly. I love trying things, sometimes including philosophy, art, and adventure. Here on meiert.com I share some of my views and experiences.

If you have a question or suggestion about what I write, please leave a comment (if available) or a message. Thank you!

Comments (Closed)

  1. On October 8, 2008, 6:27 CEST, Joe Clark said:

    Use links that make sense in their context, not out of context.

  2. On October 8, 2008, 8:55 CEST, Jens Oliver Meiert said:

    Valid distinction. I just quoted the guidelines.

  3. On October 22, 2008, 11:24 CEST, Richard Morton said:

    As WCAG 2.0 is still at the candidate recommendation stage, I must admit that my knowledge of it is lacking so it is definitely useful to see it summarised here. One thing I have found useful to help me remember the overall concept is POUR (Perceivable, Operable, Understandable, Robust), which I think is a really good way of explaining accessibility in a non-technical way.

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