Jens Oliver Meiert

March 2009

The Stupidest Style Sheet Name Ever

This might irritate a few people, but the last name you want to pick for your style sheet is “style.css”. Why is “style.css” such a poor CSS file name? The main reason is maintenance…

Post from March 25, 2009, filed under .

CSS: Style the Non-Obvious

One of the qualities you have to acquire as a web developer is to see the non-obvious, and to use that skill to your code’s advantage. Let me explain by two simple examples.

Post from March 18, 2009, filed under .

Presenting… the Google Shoe

They finally arrived, long longed for Google shoes, in this case the “Google j9t” model based on the Adidas ZX700. They’re not for sale but I might share the configuration I used to design them. The “Google j9t” may only be worn for dynamite fishing and important launches.

Post from March 16, 2009, filed under .

Performance of CSS Selectors Is Irrelevant

…if you like to have a strict read of Steve Souders’ recent research. We’ve still got few but now a few more numbers backing up what we always suspected, that merely optimizing selectors is micro-optimization…

Post from March 12, 2009, filed under .

Website Optimization Measures, Part VI

In this episode: On the utilization of Google Friend Connect, maintenance of Google Analytics, sanity checks, type attributes, charset rules, cite elements, and ICRA labels. Fresh and sexy.

Post from March 10, 2009, filed under .

When to Split Style Sheets

Three factors influence whether or not it makes sense to split style sheets: probability, meaning (aka semantics), and granularity.

Post from March 5, 2009, filed under .

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Last update: July 16, 2017

“The end does not justify the means.”